Which Android Devices Get Updated Most – Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0

In case I lose the link and that other spammy google+ link keeps appearing and I never find it again, here is the link to the google android updates image.

This shows which cell phones get the latest Android updates, including ice cream sandwich 4.0. It is a graph, also known as a chart or a horizontal bar graph.

May I never lose this again. The chart shows data for Android devices manufactured by Samsung, Motorola and HTC among others. Colors used are yellow, orange, green and red and the detailed Android updates chart is compiled by a Michael DeGusta from theunderstatement.com.  The site uses a favicon of what appears to be his face.

Android Updates chart


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One Response to Which Android Devices Get Updated Most – Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0

  1. I hated that article when it came out, although the infographic does tell an interesting and troubling story. He doesn’t even address the fact that ROMs are available for most or all of those phones – I agree that isn’t an option for most users, but that’s not the same thing as saying “If you buy an Android phone, you won’t get updates”.

    Here’s the part that bothered me most, though:

    Along similar lines, a very small but perhaps telling point: the price of every single Android phone I looked at ended with 99 cents – something Apple has never done (the iPhone is $199, not $199.99). It’s almost like a warning sign: you’re buying a platform that will nickel-and-dime you with ads and undeletable bloatware, and it starts with those 99 cents.

    I have no idea how Android as a platform “nickel-and-dimes you with ads” any more than iOS does. If you download free apps, they’re supported by ads. Unlike iOS, most free Android apps have paid, ad-free version you get purchase via a license key. On iOS, that’s harder to do, and you have to pretty much write a completely second, crippled app if you want to offer both versions.